EPDM & Green Roofing

Please browse through the following topics on green roofing. If you have any further questions that you’d like answered, please do not hesitate to get in touch.

  • What is a green roof?
  • Can the EPDM membrane be combined with a green roof system?
  • Are green roofs environmentally friendly?
  • What structures can support a green roof?
  • Can Green Roof’s benefit planning applications?
  • What is the difference between a green roof and a living roof?
  • What are the key benefits of a green roof?
  • Types of Green Roof – Extensive
  • Types of Green Roof – Intensive
  • Types of Green Roof – Brown/Biodiverse Roof
  • Can the EPDM membrane be combined with a green roof system?
  • Considerations before opting for a green roof
  • Benefits of a Living roof with EPDM

What is a green roof?

A green roof is a flat roof that has been prepared in such a way that it can be planted or landscaped. There are many types and options available to choose from depending on the visual effect required, the initial costs, structural ability to support the desired type of roof and amount of time available to maintain it.

Can the EPDM membrane be combined with a green roof system?

Yes, a green roof system can be laid using EPDM membrane, provided that a root-resistant geotextile barrier is used between the planting and the membrane. Green roofing systems are multi-layered and specific.

Are green roofs environmentally friendly?

Yes. Green roofs provide a chance to put natural landscape back into towns and cities. They can be planted as gardens or meadows offering flowers to feed bees, butterflies, and indeed other insects that in turn support the garden bird population. They can, in fact, support entire eco systems, in addition to contributing to CO2 reduction.

What structures can support a green roof?

Almost any flat roof can support a basic (extensive) green roof or a brown roof, from small structures such as porches, sheds, and house extensions, to the largest commercial structures.

Can Green Roof’s benefit planning applications?

In some areas planning applications may be treated more favourably by incorporating a green roof.

What is the difference between a green roof and a living roof?

The difference between the two is sometimes just a matter of terminology, but the difference in definition is the deeper structure of a living roof – allowing it to function as a garden would, and enabling landscaping, lawns and even trees.

What are the key benefits of a green roof?

The benefits are numerous, and some may be specific to the property owner, but the key benfits are as follows:

  • Environmentally friendly
  • Can be an aid to planning
  • Increased life expectancy to waterproofing
  • Reduces water run volume
  • Keeps roofs cooler in the summer and warmer in the winter
  • Aesthetically pleasing
  • Increased amenity space
  • Recreating habitat

Types of Green Roof – Extensive

Probably the most common type. Consists of a shallow layer of substrate, typically 50mm – 150mm deep, and a variety of drought tolerant hardy plants / vegetation.

Maintenance

They are relatively self-sufficient and low maintenance.

Types of Green Roof – Intensive

Unlike the extensive green roofs, an intensive green roof can be as simplistic or as complex as the client deserves. Intensive roofs consist of a deep soil layer, typically 150mm – 1500mm. Due to this soil layer, there is a greater scope when it comes to planting. The roof can be viewed very much like a traditional garden area and within reason can be landscaped accordingly to include lawns, tress, flower beds and paved areas. Also referred to as a roof garden or living roof.

Maintenance

Generally speaking, when it comes down to maintenance an intensive green roof requires the same level of care and attention as any traditional garden.

Types of Green Roof – Brown Roof / Biodiverse Roof / Rubble Roof

The term Brown Roof is commonly used to refer ti a roof where the vegetation is intended to replicate the existing brownfield habitat.  With an increasing number of developments undertaken on brownfield land, Brown Roofs can partly mitigate this loss of habitat.
This type of roof can be seeded like the intensive or extensive roofs, or self colonised. Please note that seeding does increase the biodiversity potential of the roof in the short term. Also referred to as a biodiverse or rubble roof.

Maintenance

Similar to that of an extensive Green Roof. Minimal maintenance is required. Aggregate and vegetation choice is determined by the biodiversity objective the client would like to achieve.